Why You Should Have Fall Lawn Aeration and Maintenance Service

guy aerating a lawnIf you are a Roswell homeowner, it might be a good idea to set up fall lawn aeration service. That way it is much easier to keep your cool season Fescue the way it should be. You’ll be helping your lawn stay healthy throughout the winter and into the summer, and you won’t have to worry about all of your leaves.

While you only need to have your lawn aerated once each year, you can have the lawn maintenance service come and take care of your leaves several times during the fall. If you have a top landscaping Roswell GA company comes out to do a fall leaf clean up regularly, you won’t have to worry about them ruining your lawn. You will have a nice, leaf-free yard all season long.

You want to make sure that you do take care of your lawn during the fall. It is the time of year when it matters the most. In addition to the fall lawn aeration, you want to make sure the leaves don’t pile up too much and the sticks and other debris are picked up.

When you hire a Roswell lawn maintenance service (a local landscaper), you don’t have to do it yourself which is nice. You can sit back and relax when they come to work on your Fescue lawn. It is the best way to get it done.

Like any service you will have to pay for it. It might be a good idea to call around to different local lawn service companies to see what their rates are. You also want to ask them what they take care of and what they don’t.

Using all of that information you should be able to hire one to come work on your yard. You will be glad you did when you see how nice it looks and know you didn’t have to do it yourself.

lawn aeration RoswellYou can decide at the end of the season if you want to hire them again the next year. That should be based on how good of a job they did and if they did what you wanted. Don’t feel badly if you end up hiring a different company the next year.

Your neighbors might notice how nice your lawn looks and ask you about how you get it looking that way. Don’t be shy about telling them about the service. Let them know the information in case they want to hire them too.

Be sure to get your cool season turf tall fescue lawn aerated in the fall before the winter comes. It won’t be too hot or too cold outside and it will really help promote strong root growth that will ensure a beautiful yard next season. Having the Roswell GA landscaping company take care of it for you will make it that much easier to do so.

The wasted space of roads designed for peak-car use [Via…



The wasted space of roads designed for peak-car use

[Via blogger cityhaul] “Georgia 400 construction, looking south toward Atlanta Financial Center, March 4, 1990.”

What an incredible photo this is. It shows the construction of Georgia highway 400 as it heads south into Atlanta’s Buckhead area and under a group of offices.

I was just talking this evening about the amount of land in the city used for car infrastructure. There are many roads that are built wide for peak-use car capacity. Lanes are stretched out so that they can accommodate the masses of cars that pass through at peak hours.

Think of all that space and how it goes underused and empty at off-peak times — meaning most of the hours in a day. And think of how wide it needs to be to channel cars versus trains, bikes or pedestrians, which all require less space per person.

Think of how much walkable city could be built in that massive land space taken up by the highway in the above photo.

cityhaul: Georgia 400 construction, looking south toward…



cityhaul:

Georgia 400 construction, looking south toward Atlanta Financial Center, March 4, 1990.

What an incredible photo this is. It shows the construction of Georgia highway 400 as it heads south into Atlanta’s Buckhead area and under a group of offices.

I was just talking this evening about the amount of land in the city used for car infrastructure. There are many roads that are built wide for peak-use car capacity. Lanes are stretched out so that they can accommodate the masses of cars that pass through at peak hours.

Think of all that space and how it goes underused and empty at off-peak times — meaning most of the hours in a day. And think of how wide it needs to be to channel cars versus trains, bikes or pedestrians, which all require less space per person.

Think of how much walkable city could be built in that massive land space taken up by the highway in the above photo.

Three pics of nature in the city, one pic of city in the nature….









Three pics of nature in the city, one pic of city in the nature.

School’s out this week so we’re taking a family staycation. Today we had a very long walk around Downtown and Sweet Auburn.

First we made a long trek to the state Capitol to see the museum there, not realizing before we set out that it was Columbus Day and thus closed. At least we got a nice look at some butterflies in the flowers of the well-tended grounds.

Then we walked up to Sweet Auburn to the Wheat Street Garden and the community garden next to it, strolling through and enjoying a look at the vegetables and flowers. And near the entrance, we saw a bouquet of crushed beer cans on the sidewalk. The combination of greatness and grit in the city is something that appeals to me.

Sounds of the city at night. I had a nice walk on Peachtree…





Sounds of the city at night.

I had a nice walk on Peachtree Street last night, from Publik in Midtown to our Downtown home. It’s a trip I take regularly and enjoy because it gives me an opportunity to pass through an assortment of spaces and activities — one that provides the kind of rich sensory mix you only find in a big city.

Some day I want to record the sounds of that walk. The cars buzzing by, the chatter of crowds in restaurants, noisy men making their way into the Pines Street homeless shelter, the hum of movement on the interstate as you walk over it, a crying baby in a stroller being pushed into a hotel…it’s a wonderful diversity.

And the sounds come in waves, with pauses in the middle as you walk past quiet buildings like the beautiful Imperial Hotel, above (not actually a hotel, btw), and the dead silence from empty structures such as a long-abandoned Medical Arts building.

Making a recording of that is on my to-do list, but for now I’m happy to experience it.

Atlanta’s “Sunday in the Park”: enjoying a cemetery as a public…







Atlanta’s “Sunday in the Park”: enjoying a cemetery as a public park

One of my favorite Atlanta traditions, and definitely my favorite local festival, is the Sunday in the Park festival that takes place annually in Oakland Cemetery. It’s a fun way to celebrate the city’s history while taking in a nice stretch of green space. 

Begun in 1850 on six acres — which, given the burning of the city in the Civil War, remain one of the oldest plots of land in Atlanta —  Oakland (now 48 acres) is a great example of 19th-century America’s unique ‘garden cemeteries’, places that were intended for use as public parks just as much as they were burial grounds. 

In an Atlantic Cities piece titled “Our First Public Parks: The Forgotten History of Cemeteries,” author Keith Eggener says that cemeteries of the 19th century were places where anyone could “meditate, where you can come into contact with spirituality and concentrate.” He adds:

“They were quite important spaces for recreation as well. Keep in mind, the great rural cemeteries were built at a time when there weren’t public parks, or art museums, or botanical gardens in American cities. You suddenly had large pieces of ground, filled with beautiful sculptures and horticultural art.”

The grounds of Oakland are maintained well, and it’s a lovely tree-shaded spot to spend a Sunday, particularly at  this festival with a list of events that include: local musicians, among other performers, such as the man above costumed convincingly as a statue; a Victorian costume contest; food trucks, and much more. 

Also, as you can see from the top photo above, the view of the Downtown skyline from the cemetery is impressive. 

This is a  place that often gets overlooked when we think about public green spaces in the city, and the same could be said for the enormous (if less grand) Westview Cemetery on Atlanta’s west side. They’re both good places to visit on a nice day. And don’t worry about freaking out kids — they’re more open to accepting cemeteries as park spaces than you might think. 

EDIT: Apologies to anyone who read the pre-edited version where I referred to this as “one of the newer” Atlanta events. Thanks to reader Kyle for pointing out that it’s been going on for decades. Embarrassingly, I only found out about Sunday in the Park a few years ago.

Atlanta’s “Sunday in the Park”: enjoying a…







Atlanta’s “Sunday in the Park”: enjoying a cemetery as a public park

One of my favorite of the newer Atlanta traditions, and definitely my favorite local festival, is the Sunday in the Park festival that takes place annually in Oakland Cemetery. It’s a fun way to celebrate the city’s history while taking in a nice stretch of green space. 

Begun in 1850 on six acres — which, given the burning of the city in the Civil War, remain one of the oldest plots of land in Atlanta —  Oakland (now 48 acres) is a great example of 19th-century America’s unique ‘garden cemeteries’, places that were intended for use as public parks just as much as they were burial grounds. 

In an Atlantic Cities piece titled “Our First Public Parks: The Forgotten History of Cemeteries,” author Keith Eggener says that cemeteries of the 19th century were places where anyone could “meditate, where you can come into contact with spirituality and concentrate.” He adds:

“They were quite important spaces for recreation as well. Keep in mind, the great rural cemeteries were built at a time when there weren’t public parks, or art museums, or botanical gardens in American cities. You suddenly had large pieces of ground, filled with beautiful sculptures and horticultural art.”

The grounds of Oakland are maintained well, and it’s a lovely tree-shaded spot to spend a Sunday, particularly at  this festival with a list of events that include: local musicians, among other performers, such as the man above costumed convincingly as a statue; a Victorian costume contest; food trucks, and much more. 

Also, as you can see from the top photo above, the view of the Downtown skyline from the cemetery is impressive. 

This is a  place that often gets overlooked when we think about public green spaces in the city, and the same could be said for the enormous (if less grand) Westview Cemetery on Atlanta’s west side. They’re both good places to visit on a nice day. And don’t worry about freaking out kids — they’re more open to accepting cemeteries as park spaces than you might think.